Fixing Cracked Windows

by Lee Wyatt
(last updated May 15, 2012)

Simply driving down the road can be a tad dangerous for cars and trucks. After all, all it takes is a single pebble to pop up and hit the windshield just right and you find yourself faced with a hairline crack all over the window. In fact this, or something similar, has happened to just about everyone at one time or another. Luckily, fixing cracked windows isn't all that difficult as long as you follow these simple directions.

Materials needed:

  • Window repair kit (bridge kit type)
  • Narrow metal probe (i.e., flattened wire hanger)
  • Glass cleaner
  • Squeegee

Procedure:

  1. Inspect the windows. Take a look at not only the cracked window, but all the other ones on your vehicle as well. This will allow you to identify any other cracks that may need your attention. With each crack that you find, take the time to measure the cracks. While you can repair a crack that runs your entire window, you really should focus on the ones that aren't that big. Ideally, you will only want to fix the ones that are six inches or smaller. Any crack that is larger than that and you really want to replace the windshield or window.
  2. Get the kit. Go to your local auto parts, hardware, or similar type of store and look for a window repair kit. Ideally you will get one that is referred to as a bridge kit, since it comes with some suction cups that will help with the whole process. The bridge kit is usually the best kind to get when you have a crack on a vertical window.
  3. Clean the crack. To the best of your ability, clean out the crack that is on the window. In addition to using water, glass cleaner, or some other type of cleaning solution you may want to use a narrow metal probe to help clean out the crack. This will help ensure that there is no loose dirt, glass, or other debris that could end up hampering the repair process.
  4. Follow the directions of the kit. Once you have the crack cleaned, take a bit of time to familiarize yourself with the directions that came with your kit. These directions will give you step by step instructions from the manufacturer, and are usually the best ones to follow.
  5. Apply resurfacing resin. Once you have followed the directions and filled in the crack, it's time to smooth out the surface. Apply some of the resurfacing resin (which should have come with the kit) directly to the crack, and then apply a cellophane patch to that resin. This patch needs to have direct sunlight or an ultraviolet lamp shining on it to dry appropriately. Once it has dried, remove the patch using a razor blade to ensure that you have the surface as level as possible.
  6. Clean window. After you have removed the cellophane, and made the surface around the crack as smooth as possible, it is time to clean your window. This can be done the same way that you always clean your window, just make sure that you do as good of a job as possible. This will allow you to see if there are any remaining pieces of resin that you missed.

Author Bio

Lee Wyatt

Contributor of numerous Tips.Net articles, Lee Wyatt is quickly becoming a regular "Jack of all trades." He is currently an independent contractor specializing in writing and editing. Contact him today for all of your writing and editing needs! Click here to contact. ...

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